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Gold/silver price ratio getting silly again

Arithmetic is a harsh mistress. Irrespective of how badly the banking cabal wishes to suppress the prices of gold and silver, and irrespective of how much brute force they are able to apply to the market over the short term with their (illegal) manipulations; the inexorable pull of supply and demand will inevitably overwhelm any/all such operations.

This is not the whimsical theory of some ivory-tower economist, but a simple fact of markets which has been demonstrated to us all in totally unequivocal parameters. Thus back in the “bad, old days” of manipulation – when the banksters still had large hoards of bullion to dump onto the market and crush the price – the price of silver was pushed to a 600-year low (in real dollars). What did the extreme manipulation of the silver market in the 1990’s reap for the banksters? A1,000% increase in the price of silver over the following decade.

The misunderstanding of most novice investors in this sector (and a source of tremendous frustration) is that these short-term episodes of manipulation somehow delay (or even prevent) gold and silver prices from reaching their “maximum” levels. In fact the precise opposite is the truth: each and every manipulation operation translates to even higher long-term prices for gold and silver. It’s all just simple arithmetic.

Perhaps the easiest way to illustrate these dynamics is through comparing the gold market and the silver market. While both of these markets have been subjected to extreme manipulation, it is clear that manipulation of the silver market has been much more severe. There are two related numbers which illustrate this point.

Knowledgeable investors know that the long-term price ratio of gold versus silver (i.e. over roughly 5,000 years) has averaged approximately 15:1. This closely coincides with the ratio of the natural occurrence of these two elements in the Earth’s crust (approximately 17:1). Not only did this price ratio remain relatively constant over several millennia, but the fact that the price ratio so closely mirrors the rate of occurrence of the two metals shows that (in relative terms) our species has demonstrated a roughly equal preference for the two metals throughout recorded history.

These facts establish beyond any possible contradiction that over the medium or long term the price of silver must remain at close to a 15:1 ratio versus the price of gold. There is only one factor which could alter this arithmetic: if our preference toward the two metals changed. Has any such change in preferences occurred? Yes. Silver has become much more popular.

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Posted by on Jan 10 2012. Filed under Silver Analysis. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0. You can leave a response or trackback to this entry

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